Tag Archives: Features

This Glock Drill Is the Easiest Way To Make Holes In Anything [Guns]

This Glock Drill Is the Easiest Way To Make Holes In AnythingThe gun enthusiasts at Allen Arms Indoor Range in Greenville, South Carolina, decided to combine their love of all hole-making tools by modding this Glock Model 21 to look like a DeWalt cordless drill.

But sadly, even though there’s a bit protruding from the front, the drill doesn’t actually work. Although, that of course doesn’t stop this creation from easily making holes wherever you need one.

This Glock Drill Is the Easiest Way To Make Holes In Anything

[Glock Forum via HelaBlog]

Article source: http://feeds.gawker.com/~r/gizmodo/full/~3/AE4ixcxG_LM/this-glock-drill-is-the-easiest-way-to-make-holes-in-anything

If This Isn’t the Best Phone Stand Ever Created By Mankind I Don’t Know What Is [Gadgets]

If This Isn't the Best Phone Stand Ever Created By Mankind I Don't Know What Is“Dear Gizmodo,” the email started, “I would like to introduce our new product.” I could have never imagined that such a neutral phrase was hiding the best phone stand ever created by mankind, one that can store your headphones and act as a keyring and make your phone look like a duck face.

Yes, that’s right—THIS PHONE STAND IS ACTUALLY A RUBBER DUCK’S BEAK. The cutest, most perfecterest rubber duck beak any human can possibly imagine. I want to kiss it. Everyone should have one.

The name of this $20 sucking cup thingamajig is the iDuck. But. Of. Course. And it’s the creation of a Korean design company that responds to the magical name of Knock of Neverland— which shall become the name of all my future children.

This is what the chief knocking neverlander had to say about it:

The duck beak shape is very familiar with us. There are many kinds of duck beak products in the world. But only iDuck can transform your mobile phone into a duck face (You can use the eye stickers in the package).

We think mobile phone is the most often used device and a necessary gadget to us these days. We want to give them not only convenient functions but also witty accents.

Where have you been all my life? No. Please don’t answer. It’s ok. I’m just happy you are finally here. Let’s spoon in silence. [Konstore]

If This Isn't the Best Phone Stand Ever Created By Mankind I Don't Know What Is If This Isn't the Best Phone Stand Ever Created By Mankind I Don't Know What Is If This Isn't the Best Phone Stand Ever Created By Mankind I Don't Know What Is If This Isn't the Best Phone Stand Ever Created By Mankind I Don't Know What Is

Article source: http://feeds.gawker.com/~r/gizmodo/full/~3/Ap1jSew2VRw/if-this-is-not-the-best-phone-stand-ever-created-by-mankind-i-dont-know-what-is

Nine Things We Really, Really Want from Windows Phone 8 [Windows Phone]

Nine Things We Really, Really Want from Windows Phone 8Windows Phone has a great premise—a set of beautiful, minimalist tiles take the place of a million apps. It’s brilliant in its simplicity. But it needs to get its shit together. Today, we could get a first look at Windows Phone 8. Here’s what it needs to deliver.

Social skills

WinPho’s People tile is one of its best draws—at times it actually makes you forget how mediocre the third party apps for Twitter and Facebook are. Your contacts and social media pals are all whirled into one hub, giving you a stream of updates, favorite people to check in on, and a quick way of chiming in. But it’s severely lacking. You can’t attach photos to a tweet, hashtags aren’t clickable, there’s no way to view your Facebook Timeline (or someone else’s), and there’s no way to view a full Twitter conversation. Foursquare is missing entirely. For this stuff, you’ll have to fire up the dedicated apps for each service, which defeats the purpose of Windows Phone.

Helpful notifications

Windows Phone’s notifications suck. From the lock screen, you can see if you’ve received emails, but it’ll take several swipes to see who they’re even from. Swiping down from the top only shows you the clock and battery life. Where’s the notification center? Oh right! There isn’t one.

Media makeover

WP’s music player is a hand-grenade-rolled-into-Sephora mess, crowded among too many other offerings in the “Music + Videos” tile. Music shouldn’t be hub-ified. We want instant gratification when it comes to this stuff, not a broad menu of podcasts, movies, apps, and playlists. Really, just rip off the iOS music app—it’s more or less perfect.

Please stop making me click to load images in emails

Every single time you receive an email with inline graphics, you have to tap to load them. Even if it’s from your best friend from whom you’ve received tens of thousands of emails, and has earned your email trust. Every. Single. Time.

Internet Explorer is slow

Too slow. Apollo needs to light some Sun God fire under IE’s ass, because it’s considerably lagging behind Android and iOS’ mobile browsing. So, then, what’s the point of the LTE speed?

Brightness adjustment

There are three settings for WP screen brightness: low, medium, and high. Or you can let it auto-adjust, based on God knows what. Give us a slider. This is standard stuff, and a small absence that will slowly drive you crazy.

Play nice with others

Add AIM and GChat to the IM offerings—be the bigger phone-man than Apple. Nobody is going to use the Windows Live substitutes, and Microsoft needs to accept that. Make maps rich as hell with Yelp, Foursquare, MenuPages, and OpenTable data. Bring. It. All. Together. Use the people who do it best.

Public transit

Apple is taking a beating on this one—the lack of public transportation guidance in iOS 6 Maps is awful. Give us what Apple won’t. Or maybe validate those rumors about Nokia’s stellar map apps replacing Microsoft’s own in WP8. That’d be nice.

Camera control

We need a better camera app. Now, when you touch to focus, the camera automatically takes a picture. It’s straight-up annoying. You need to be able to focus on something and then decide to take a picture.

Please do these things, Microsoft. We want WP to be great. This is tough love.

Original image: Shutterstock/brushingup

Article source: http://feeds.gawker.com/~r/gizmodo/full/~3/I3Ij7P-3R4k/nine-things-we-really-really-want-from-windows-phone-8

Samsung Galaxy S III Review: A Great Phone That Tries Too Hard [Video]

Samsung Galaxy S III Review: A Great Phone That Tries Too Hard Samsung’s Galaxy S II was the king of Android in 2011. But now HTC is on top with the new One X. The Galaxy S III is the most anticipated spec-beast of the year (so far), but does it have enough to rule 2012? We put it through its paces to find out.

The Galaxy S II was the best selling Android phone of 2011. It was available on virtually every carrier (sometimes under different names). It had a fast, dual-core processor, a big beautiful screen, and Samsung’s TouchWiz UI painted over Android (not a positive). The S III looks to improve on that in every way, with a new processor, a whopping 2 gigs of RAM, HD screen, LTE, NFC, and more software bells and whistles than you could ever possibly use.

From a design standpoint, the S III is lovely. There’s a subtle curve to everything, which makes everything feel nice and smooth. The screen is a huge 4.8 inches (just shy of the Galaxy Note 5.3 inch screen), but Samsung shrank the bezel so that it’s virtually the same size as the Galaxy Nexus (4.65 inch screen). Samsung broke convention here with the buttons. While most new phones are going without navigation buttons at all, or with the standard Android four, Samsung went with a capacitive back button, a capacitive menu button, and a physical home button. Pressing the home button once takes you to your home screen, holding it opens the task switcher, and double-clicking it opens the voice commands. It’s very intuitive.

The international version of the S III uses Samsung’s new quad-core Exynos processor, but because the company hasn’t figured out how to make it work with LTE (really guys?) the U.S. version uses Qualcomm’s Snapdragon S4. The S4 is a great processor for a dual-core, but last year’s Exynos (also dual-core) smoked everything in its path, and there are a lot of people who are going to be bummed that the quad-core version isn’t going to make it to the states. That said, the S4 almost never stutters at all. Navigation around desktops and websites is fast and fluid, and apps load quickly. Radio connectivity was also good, and it locked onto a signal nice and quickly.

Now, let’s talk bells and whistles. Samsung went a little nuts on the software side, slapping so many tricks and tweaks on top of Ice Cream Sandwich (Android 4.0) that it’s easy to feel a bit overwhelmed. Some of them are genuinely useful, some are useless, and some just simply don’t work. There are also some very slick accessories. The Universal Multimedia Desktop Dock, for example, looks good, folds up nicely, and is easy to get your phone in and out of ($50). There’s also the HDTV Smart Adapter which lets you plug your phone directly into an HDMI cable and into your TV so you can stream video, music, games, etc. It works a lot better than HTC’s attempt at this, which uses Wi-Fi, but it definitely doesn’t have great frame-rates, and audio could be out of sync ($40).

Samsung Galaxy S III Review: A Great Phone That Tries Too HardThe phone looks and feels great. It’s smooth like a polished stone, but very light. Samsung corrected some of the biggest mistakes on the Galaxy Nexus. For starters, the camera is absolutely terrific. Photos were incredibly sharp and detailed, and colors looked good. It does struggle with dynamic range when something is brightly backlit, but it’s not too bad (and the HDR mode helps compensate). The camera software is not as nice or intuitive as HTC’s but the image quality makes up for it. The Galaxy S II won our mobile phone video battle last year, and video on the S III is even better—really crisp looking footage. The front-facing camera at 1.9MP is way better than most of the other front-facers out there. (Click here for full res photo and video samples.)

Some of the bells/whistles are great. If you have a text message open and you lift the phone up to your ear, it will sense that and automatically call that contact. It can use the front-facing camera to see if you’re looking at it, and if you are it won’t dim the screen. With NFC, you can click two Galaxy S IIIs together to share content (photo, video, contacts, maps, etc) via S Beam, which is quite handy. If you get a call you don’t want to take, just turn the phone face down to mute the ringer and reject the call. Swiping with the side of your hand takes a screen shot. I also really enjoyed using the programmable TecTiles (those little NFC stickers) to quickly toggle a bunch of settings at once, or to send the same text message to my ladyfriend when I left work.

Really, though, the best feature is that it’s just a good phone at its core. We tested the ATT, Sprint, and T-Mobile versions. Call quality was good on all three. ATT’s LTE peaked at 24Mbps down / 13 Mbps up. T-Mobile uses HSPA+ instead of LTE, and it peaked at 9.6Mbps down / 3Mbps up. Sprint’s was limited to 3G and peaked at 2.5Mbps down / .9Mbps up, but expect that to improve when Sprint launches LTE later this year. Navigating the phone is fast and smooth, and the speaker is loud enough (not the case with the Galaxy Nexus) so that you won’t miss calls. This thing does not slow down even when you have a ton of apps open, thanks to the crazypants 2GB of RAM. To put that in perspective, my MacBook Pro came with 2GB of RAM when I bought it just four years ago. That is nuts. We need more time before we can report on battery life, but for now it seems about average. Most days we got through without needing a charge, but not all days.

We liked how HTC just lightly augmented Ice Cream Sandwich with little improvements here and there. Samsung went with the more is more approach, and the Galaxy S III suffers for it. The TouchWiz UI is not as intuitive as it could be, and it often adds more steps to get it to behave the way you want. For example, creating folders is now less intuitive. Some of the bells and whistles are cool (like Share Shot, where each photo you take is auto-shared within a group at a party), but most people will never use the majority of them. And some just seem broken. S Voice, which is Samsung’s answer to Siri, gives wildly inconsistent results. And you’re supposed to be able to say “Cheese” to signal the camera to snap a photo, but it never worked, not once, even when the Samsung reps tried it.

The screen is pretty nice on its own, but when you put it next to the HTC One X it literally pales in comparison. Not only is it extremely blue, but it’s not nearly bright enough. Using navigation on a road trip, I had to shade the screen with my hand in order to see it (not safe!). The One X was brighter at 70 percent than the S III was at full. It also seems more pixelated because of the Pentile display, even though it’s almost the same PPI as the One X. Also, there is no dedicated camera button. Grrr! If you’re going to put the best camera on a phone, then put a dedicated, physical camera button on it! Nobody who has one wishes they didn’t. Seriously. We’re tired of saying it.

While the S4 processor is pretty hardy, there are rare occasions where it struggles and skips. Mirroring out through HDMI, for example, is not nearly as smooth as it is when the quad-core Tegra 3 is driving. Can’t help but wonder if the new Exynos could have handled it better. Also, the volume rocker and power on/off button are directly opposite each other so it’s hard to press one without accidentally pressing the other.

 

Samsung Galaxy S III Review: A Great Phone That Tries Too HardIf you are on Verizon or T-Mobile, then yes, definitely. It will be without a doubt the best phone on those two carriers when it drops. If you’re on ATT or Sprint, then you’ve got a tough choice because of the One X and the EVO 4G LTE, respectively. If you want the best screen and a lighter touch on the software, go HTC. If you want the best camera and more bells and whistles, go Samsung. Really, though, you won’t go wrong with either.

 

Samsung Galaxy S III Specs

OS: Android 4.0
Screen: 4.8-inch Super AMOLED
Processor and RAM: 1.5GHz dual-core Snapdragon S4 / 2GB RAM
Storage: 16GB / 32 GB + Micro SD card slow
Camera: Back: 8MP, Front: 1.9MP
Weight: 4.69 ounces
Battery: 2100 mAh Li-Po
Price: $200/16GB, $250/32GB (w/ 2 year contract)
Giz Rank: 4 Stars

Video by Michael Hession.

Article source: http://feeds.gawker.com/~r/gizmodo/full/~3/r7Kg4YkcfBI/samsung-galaxy-s-iii-review-a-great-phone-that-tries-too-hard

All the Windows 8 Phone Rumors Fit to Print [Windows 8 Phone]

All the Windows Phone 8 Rumors Fit to PrintUnwilling to give up the spotlight just yet, Microsoft has planned another Big Announcement for tomorrow, June 20. The Redmond, Washington-based company is flying out to San Francisco, for what will be a two-day developers summit full of surprises.

One such surprise, which is generating a lot of eleventh-hour excitement, is the anticipated Windows Phone 8. Here is what we know, and what rumors have suggested, so far…

Codename: Apollo (or Windows Phone 8)

Upgrade: Multi-core processors (a step up from the single core units used in handsets like the Lumia)

Update: Windows NT core OS (rather than the outmoded Windows CE platform used in the Windows Phone 7)

We’ll continue to update with additional info as it comes and look forward to the Big Announcement tomorrow at 12PM EST. Stay tuned… [CNET, Engadget, AppleInsider, AllThingsD]

Article source: http://feeds.gawker.com/~r/gizmodo/full/~3/MaWa7GER2Og/all-the-windows-8-phone-rumors-fit-to-print

Nomiku’s immersion circulator makes sous vide cooking available to the masses, we go hands-on

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If you’ve ever spent time watching Iron Chef or other cooking shows, odds are you’ve heard of the term sous vide and know the wonders of cooking with immersion circulators. For those not in the know, an immersion circulator cooks food in a water bath at a precise (to the degree) temperature to ensure perfect doneness of dishes. Nomiku’s an immersion circulator that clips onto any pot of water, giving home cooks the ability to sous vide to their heart’s content at temperatures up to 100 degrees Celsius. The device is a machined aluminum tube and heat sink, with a 1.3-inch touchscreen OLED display on top surrounded by a plastic knob. Inside is an impeller and 750W PTC heating element that circulates water at up to 10 liters per minute and heat it to within .2 degrees Celsius of the temperature you choose. Just tap the touchscreen to turn it on, stick it in a pot with up to 5 gallons of water, turn the knob to set your temperature, tap the screen again to get it going and, presto, you (or your sous chef bot) will be cooking succulent meats like Bobby Flay in no time.

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For now, Nomiku exists only in prototype form, but the folks behind it have launched a Kickstarter page to get the funding needed to ramp up production. We got to see the prototype in person, and as a casual dabbler in the culinary arts, the appeal was easy for us to see. It’s dead simple to use, and is about the same size as a hand blender, so most folks won’t have a problem finding a place for it in their kitchen. In speaking with its creators, we discovered that they created Nomiku to make sous vide cooking easy and (relatively) affordable. You see, existing immersion circulators cost between $500-$2000, which puts them out of reach for most home cooks, but Nomiku (should the project get funded) will retail for $299. Itchin’ to get one in your kitchen? Well, head on down to the source link to help make it happen, and feel free to peruse our gallery of photos while you wait for its arrival.

Article Source: Engadget

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