Tag Archives: DIY

Calculate Your Friend Base Value to Launch a Successful Crowdfunding Project [Crowdfunding]


Kevin Purdy

Calculate Your Friend Base Value to Launch a Successful Crowdfunding ProjectGot a project you’re dying to raise crowd-sourced money for, but not sure how much to shoot for? Here’s a hint: calculate how many of your friends and close contacts could give an upper-tier amount, then divide it by five. That’s your starting point.

Sarah Gilbert, writing for the Get Rich Slowly blog, details the nuts and bolts of getting together $8,000 for a literary magazine aimed at parents. There’s some of the general psychology and marketing talk you’d expect—being your own best cheerleader, choosing smart rewards—but also some helpful thumbnail accounting advice on goals and money. Here’s Gilbert’s system for figuring out the true minimum of what you can raise:

Guess at the monetary size of your friend base. You’ll need at least five times the amount you’re shooting for in “capacity.” I thought of many friends who could afford the higher contributions – say, $100 to $1000 each. Only about 10% of those who I thought could give at these high levels did (while many gave at lower levels, many didn’t give at all). This could be anything from simply not being on social media during your campaign, to a reluctance to give money to relatives, to a distrust of the online payment process. About 1/5th of my Facebook friends gave.

Another good idea? Make sure you look good to a potential backer who’s carefully vetting your project. Any other tips on crowdfunding number-crunching are welcome in the comments. Photo by epSos.de.

How I Launched a Successful Kickstarter Campaign | Get Rich Slowly

Article source: http://feeds.gawker.com/~r/lifehacker/full/~3/eq1Lsv3rzLE/calculate-your-friend-base-value-to-launch-a-successful-crowdfunding-project

App Organization, Accessing Downed Web Pages, and Slimming Your Wallet [From The Tips Box]

Readers offer their best tips for smarter arrangement of your mobile apps, quickly accessing Google’s cached web pages, and preventing your wallet from bursting with rewards cards.

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Every day we receive boatloads of great reader tips in our inbox, but for various reasons—maybe they’re a bit too niche, maybe we couldn’t find a good way to present it, or maybe we just couldn’t fit it in—the tip didn’t make the front page. From the Tips Box is where we round up some of our favorites for your buffet-style consumption. Got a tip of your own to share? Add it in the comments, email it to tips at lifehacker.com or share it on our tips page.

Article source: http://feeds.gawker.com/~r/lifehacker/full/~3/UHAuyfvbQXc/

DrWright for Linux Forces You to Stop Typing and Take a Break [Linux Downloads]


Alan Henry

DrWright for Linux Forces You to Stop Typing and Take a Break Linux: We’ve discussed several apps for Windows and a few others for Mac that remind you to take breaks periodically, but Linux users need some love too, and DrWright, a free, open-source utility that locks your system periodically so you take a break, gets the job done.

The utility is simple, but works fabulously: open the app’s settings, and tell DrWright (referred to as “Typing Break” after install) how long you want to go between breaks, and how long you want your break to last. Give yourself the option to postpone those breaks, or leave the “Allow postponing of breaks” checkbox empty to give DrWright complete control and force you to stop working. When it’s time for a break, the app will lock your screen for the duration of your break, and it won’t let you back in until your break is over.

Sure, you could find creative ways around the block, but ideally you really should get up, move around, and take a break from typing, so it’s better off to just do so. There are packages for Ubuntu, Arch, Fedora, and others at the link below.

drwright | GNOME Live! via MakeUseOf

Article source: http://feeds.gawker.com/~r/lifehacker/full/~3/hIKi4vwU6mo/drwright-for-linux-forces-you-to-stop-typing-and-take-a-break

Turn the Back of Your Monitor Into a Workspace Utility Belt [Storage]


Thorin Klosowski

Turn the Back of Your Monitor Into a Workspace Utility BeltIn most cases, the back of your desktop monitor is nothing more than wasted space. If you have an all-in-one system like an iMac, that space is even more cluttered because it has cables coming out of it every which way. Let’s look at the ways you can turn that unused space into a useful little utility belt for storage and organization.

Create Hidden Storage for Small Junk

The majority of monitors have nothing on the back of them, save for a few ports for cables and a power cord. This means it’s a great place to store all the small stuff you have. Here’s a couple different ideas.

Store External Hard Drives

Turn the Back of Your Monitor Into a Workspace Utility BeltHave an external hard drive cluttering up your desk? This tiny shelf is a dead simple woodcut that fits snuggly on the back of an iMac. With the shelf installed, you can store anything tiny you desire. It even acts as a cable organizer. Here’s what you need:

5″ x 8″ x 1/2″ oak cut at an angle to match the slant of the iMac stand. Drilled all the way through 1″ from edges at 1/4″ diameter. 17″ x 1/4″ steel rod bent into “U” shape with brake line (rubber hose) fit on flat edge to provide grip and protection. Tapped the ends at 1/4 x 20 fit with wing nuts for easy adjustment, can be adjusted to fit at any point on stand. Added a drawer pull as a cable spool to the bottom.

It’s built for the iMac, but could certainly be repurposed to work with any monitor with a similar base. If you’d prefer to skip the DIY approach, the Backpack does the same thing for $29.99.

The Ambitious Store Everything Approach

Turn the Back of Your Monitor Into a Workspace Utility BeltIf you want to go all out, this build features pretty much everything you’ll ever need to get things done mounted directly to the back of the monitor. You get a light, index cards, speakers, an ethernet switch, and even a pen. The bulk of the work is done with the magic of double-sided tape. That means if you’re hesitant to take the all-or-nothing approach outlined here, you can certainly learn a few tricks to store other things behind your monitor.

Hide and Organize Cables

Cable clutter is the biggest hassle of getting your desk organized. Organizing them with your monitor in mind can help clear that clutter easily.

The Super Cheap Paper Pocket Method

Turn the Back of Your Monitor Into a Workspace Utility BeltIf you have a lot cables sitting around, then this clever pocket system made entirely from paper is a good way to store them out of sight. All you need is card stock paper, double-sided tape, and something to cut it all with. This method comes in especially handy with USB cables you need to access frequently, but could be used for pretty much anything you want.

Add Extension Cables for Easy Access to Tricky Ports

Turn the Back of Your Monitor Into a Workspace Utility BeltThe biggest pain of all-in-one desktops is getting to the cables in the back. One solution is to use Sugru to attach extensions to the side for easy access. If your monitor is made of aluminum, you can also use magnets for a similar effect. The end result is easy access to USB ports without having to flip around your monitor every time.

If you’re looking for a similar solution without the extensions, the Your Magnet might do the trick, or some 3M clips will work as well.

Mount Everything Else and Keep Your Desk Clear

Of course, not everything on your desk can fit into small little cubby holes or cable organizers. Bigger things need bigger solutions.

Mount Your Laptop to the Back of Your Monitor

Turn the Back of Your Monitor Into a Workspace Utility BeltIf your primary use for your laptop is through an external monitor then you know the pain of trying to figure out a good place to put your laptop. Instructables user Mattlumpkin decided to go ahead and mount it on the back of the monitor itself. The idea is actually really simple. Using a small piece of foam, Mattlumpkin created a shelf on the back of the LCD, and then setup a simple system to quickly attach all the cables. It’s certainly not pretty from the back, but who ever looks at the back of your computer?

Add a Headphone Shelf to the Side (or Back) of Your Monitor

Turn the Back of Your Monitor Into a Workspace Utility BeltA lot of us like to keep headphones around so we’re not annoying everyone around us, but the bulky cans aren’t easy to store. One solution for iMac owners is Machook, which hangs your headphones on the side of your monitor with a stylish little hook. For non-iMac owners or people who just don’t want to spend the money, a 3M Command Hook will do just as well. The bonus with the 3M hooks is that you usually get two or three in the pack so you can mount all sorts of other things to your monitor.

When you stop and think about it a little, you can use the back of your monitor to store and hide away pretty much anything. It’s essentially wasted storage space ripe for hanging peripherals, creating shelves, and organizing cables.

Title image remixed from barbaliss (Shutterstock) and Poprugin Aleksey (Shutterstock).

Article source: http://feeds.gawker.com/~r/lifehacker/full/~3/PHT-SU4G2TE/turn-the-back-of-your-monitor-into-a-workspace-utility-belt

Substitute Avocado for Butter to Cut the Fat from Baked Goods [Food Hacks]


Alan Henry

Substitute Avocado for Butter to Cut the Fat from Baked Goods If you’re watching your fat intake, or just prefer lighter baked fare, here’s one way to have your cake and eat it too: use avocado instead of butter when you fire up the mixer. You can cut the amount of saturated fat in your muffins, cakes, or cupcakes by close to half, and while the food will definitely be lighter, it’ll still be delicious and rich.

We’ve seen this tip in a couple of places, but the folk at The Kitchn explain how to apply the substitution really well:

You can substitute avocado for butter in a 1:1 ratio, but since it doesn’t melt the same way it won’t coat your dry ingredients the same. You need to increase your wet ingredients a little to compensate. In my kitchen, I just substitute avocados for half of the butter instead.

You’ll need to mash up your avocado really well to get it as smooth as possible, but other than that, you won’t need to change much about the recipe or the cooking process. The Kitchn notes that you may need to decrease your oven temp about 25 degrees if you’re going for a 100% substitution, just to prevent over-browning. Don’t go overboard—you need fat in your diet—but even so, if you’re looking for a great way to make those muffins a little healthier, this is a great way to do it.

Baking Tip: Did You Know That You Can Substitute Avocado for Butter? | The Kitchn

Article source: http://feeds.gawker.com/~r/lifehacker/full/~3/NwjfTkkc7V4/substitute-avocado-for-butter-to-cut-the-fat-from-baked-goods

Hacked Emails, Laptop Cord Management, and Quick Clipboard Security [From The Tips Box]

Readers offer their best tips for wrangling laptop cords, clearing your clipboard fast, and knowing if a virus is sending spam from your email address.

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Every day we receive boatloads of great reader tips in our inbox, but for various reasons—maybe they’re a bit too niche, maybe we couldn’t find a good way to present it, or maybe we just couldn’t fit it in—the tip didn’t make the front page. From the Tips Box is where we round up some of our favorites for your buffet-style consumption. Got a tip of your own to share? Add it in the comments, email it to tips at lifehacker.com, or share it on our tips and expert pages.

Article source: http://feeds.gawker.com/~r/lifehacker/full/~3/JH2NZhsRDxc/